Call of Duty Advanced Warfare Review

Title: Call of Duty: Advanced WarfareCall-of-Duty-Advanced-Warfare
Developer: Sledgehammer Games
Distributor: Activision
Platforms: XBOX One, XBOX 360, PS4, PS3
Approximate Campaign Length: 8 hours

Pros:
-Frequent action scenes
-Beautiful visuals and audio quality
-Beneficial upgrades
-Great equipment, and an outstanding arsenal
-Kevin Spacey
-Kevin Spacey
-Kevin Spacey

Cons:
-Many similarities to previous titles
-Conclusion falls short

More Entertaining Than:
Haze

Less Entertaining Than:
Call of Duty Modern Warfare 3

Verdict: 8 (out of 10)

The following thoughts are based on my experiences playing the XBOX One version of the game.

Arguably, Call of Duty is a franchise that continues to provide an endless source of entertainment. After 13 years and 11 games, has the oil well that was tapped to produce these iconic games begun to dry up? By the end of Advanced Warfare, the answer is of course, no, but even with that said, there was so much more that could have happened to make this title more impressive, and there could have been so much less devotion to the previous entries to make it stand out more on its own.

Advanced Warfare begins in 2055, and Atlas, a private military, yields an impressive collection of technological sophistication and weaponry, that no enemy could ever dare triumph. At the helm of this militarily force is Jonathon Irons (voiced by Kevin Spacey (squeal!)), a man whose ambition is outmatched, with countries frequently turning to him for aid, rather than the United States. The character the player portrays is one Jack Mitchell, a Marine, deployed along with his friend, William Irons (Jonathon’s son), and a wealth of other brave serviceman, to enter South Korea and put an end to the North’s attempt at seizing full control.

Despite the success of the mission, Mitchell loses a lot in the concluding battle, including his left arm, but a chance meeting with Jonathon Irons gives him access to a second chance; not only a new arm, but a new opportunity to continue being a hero in the military. Besides Irons, there are a host of other great characters you meet, including Cormack, a dedicated, powerful, combat hardened marine; Gideon, a worthy companion in a fight, with a preference for destruction, and the beautiful Ilona – but don’t let her looks fool you – she’s harder than nails, with an unflinching resolve and impressive fighting skills.

The antagonist you face is Hades, the code name of a terrorist who believes technology has corrupted the planet. Appointing himself the savoir of the people, he is convinced that technology’s desolation will lead to freedom, the ends justifying the means, even when those means are diabolical. Alongside this grave threat, there are still questions that need answers; what is Sentinel? And what’s more – when you hand over the keys of the world to one super power, are you exchanging freedom, for a cage?

Over the course of the game, depending on the Exo (skeleton) you are wearing, the player will have access to several unique abilities. You can deploy a drone (and wreck havoc from the air), activate a shield, use a stim (boost) to replenish health, use mag gloves to crawl along walls, fire a grapple (hook) to quickly move from one location to another (this is incredibly fun, especially when you used on unsuspecting enemies), or activate overdrive. For those who have played Mass Effect, do you remember Adrenaline? Same thing applies, Overdrive makes everything move slower, allowing you to adeptly take out enemies.

Alongside these tactical benefits, the rig itself can come equipped with the ability to leap great distances into the air, hover over an area, or even cause massive melee damage. You can get up close and punch someone’s lights out, or you can jump into the air, and come crashing down with enough force to knock opponents out of the way.

When it comes to grenades, you can lob either the tactical variety, which include an EMP, a flash-bang, or a new addition, which detects threats by painting their locations, causing them to brightly stand out. On the other hand, you can use the lethal kind, which include the always useful frag, or the new smart grenade, which will fly in whatever direction your cross-hair is aimed towards.

When it comes to the weapons at your disposal, despite several decades separating our time from Atlas’s, carbines, assault rifles and shotguns often react in similar ways, regardless of how attractive some of them may appear. On the other hand though, there are a couple of new additions that really deserve mentioning. The stinger Missile, is now capable of deploying several rockets at once, dealing greater damage than before. The sniper rifle feels like a hand-held rail cannon, launching a turquoise round at impeccable speed towards the target. But the best weapon, would have to be the self-regenerating laser. You only have access to this gorgeous creature a couple of times during the game – but she never disappoints.

At the end of each level moreover, your kill count, the number of head-shots, grenade kills and intelligence received are calculated, and if you prove yourself to be a valuable asset by acquiring each levels prerequisite, you receive a certain number of points, which can then be spent on obtaining some of the 22 upgrades. These include more health and a larger grenade capacity, increased speed, reduced recoil, resistance to explosions, or more energy for your exo-skeleton, among others, some of which need to be unlocked as your progress.

Although these entertaining additions to your arsenal makes the game all the more immersive, what is really impressive is the quality. The graphics are a step-up from Ghosts, with environments appearing and feeling so very real. Smoke wafts across the battlefield, as rich fires burn. Debris flies through the air, trampling across the man-made structures. Sparks erupt as bullets slam and ricochet off environmental objects. But what is most immersive, is the sound quality. The ground squelches beneath your feet after having rained. Glass creaks, and you shudder for a moment, wondering if someone heard the noise. Gun fire and explosions are hurled around you, as though possessed by extraordinary digital quality.

All of these combined come together to effectively ground characters into their environments. One particular highlight is Detroit, when a fuse blows, and for a moment you think you’re under attack, before you and Gideon alike share a smile, glad it was a false alarm. In the same level, you patrol dark hallways, constantly encountering threats, and upon turning a corner, quickly rush for the trigger at the sight of an opponent, only to realize it was a mannequin all along.

There are other impressive moments, which include running across the road that perhaps inspired AC/DC to write Highway to Hell, for not one of the drivers has a problem with running you down. On another occasion, you traverse through a frozen cavern. The walls close in around you and icicles hang on the ceiling. The Earth rumbles, and you wonder for a second if an icicle might fall and impale you in this unexplored paradise, as your team discuss how the cold is almost unbearable. There is another moment, when you must jump from one bus to another, and let’s not forget the hectic highway chase, with an awesomely powerful cannon mounted on top of your vehicle, or the moment you run along rooftops, which may remind some people of Gordon Freeman, at the beginning of Half-Life 2. Furthermore, the penultimate fight scenes will surely be remembered by all who play this game, however, as with all positive comments, there is almost always a ‘but’, and Advanced Warfare is no exception.

Despite the entertaining arsenal, and the amazing moments you encounter, and there are a great many of them, a number of the environments are very similar to previous Call of Duty games. Cities, slums, military facilities, secret bases, environments entombed in ice, highways, ships; sometimes you may find yourself wondering – have I done this before? If not in this game, then certainly elsewhere, for that is Advanced Warfare’s fatal flaw. COD Ghosts allowed the player to fight, not only in the depths of the ocean, alongside aggressive sharks, but in outer space, taking the player to areas never before explored in the franchise. Advanced Warfare never seizes this same opportunity.

Despite having a new developer taking charge of the game’s directionality, it still retains the same feel Call of Duty has in the past, and though this should not be viewed as a criticism, Sledgehammer Games had an opportunity to experiment even more with this particular title, and yet, have deviated little from former games. Even some of the technological gadgets have been ripped straight from Black Ops 2 or Ghosts. Due to this, it occasionally has that ‘same old, same old’ feeling, or perhaps even ‘been there, done that’, which may also be why the storyline often felt very predictable. If the deja vu is not enough, the ending is no where near conclusive, and if anything, after so many ordeals, and the loss of so many innocent lives, one might expect something more rewarding than what you eventually receive.

You are left with so many questions, characters and their relationships that were never truly fleshed out, and several moments in the game that fail to make comprehensive sense because of the lacking answers. In conclusion, Advanced Warfare’s campaign is destined to provide you with a wealth of action scenes and enjoyable moments. If you are a die-hard fan, you will surely not be disappointed. If however, last year’s Ghosts left you feeling as though it was awfully similar to previous titles in the franchise, don’t be surprised if that exact feeling begins to resurface yet again.

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