Freelance Editor, Writer and Poet for Hire

That’s right guys!

Looks like it is time for some shameless self promotion.

On my other blog I have recently uploaded my online resume, which includes my educational and professional history. This can be found at the link towards the end of this post.

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For the past couple of years I have on occasion participated in part time freelance work, and thought it a good idea to advertise on my blog.

I have been educated in and professionally involved with proofing, copy-editing and structural-editing, and I am further known for being a notorious grammar Nazi. Moreover, I am an online journalist, and have written articles for the Australian Business Information Service and Ausgamers, and I have additionally had poetry published both online, and in textual anthologies.

If you ever wish to have a potentially alright editor, writer or poet consult with you or your company, do not hesitate to contact me at the following link:

http://totalovrdose.wordpress.com/online-resume/

If interested, upon visiting the site, please follow the prompts!

I am perfectly amenable to negotiating a fee, and have on occasion worked Pro Bono, however I do appreciate economical compensation.

Thank you for reading!

New Opportunities Available with Good Morning Bedtime Story

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen. I hope your New Years Celebrations were great. Sorry that I have been incognito for the past few weeks. On that note, I thought I would kick the New Year off by discussing opportunities with an online company I am associated with.

Good Morning Bedtime Story, an international online organization dedicated to building an awareness of mental health through writing, poetry, art and music has a number of new prospects that are coming alive in 2014.

The first is the announcement of a forum, where people will be able to discuss issues they are having whilst dealing with their mental illness, talk about their survival stories and offer advice to others who are suffering. We hope it will become an area of the internet where those suffering depression, bipolar, schizophrenia or any other form of mental illness will be able to congregate and safely discuss their lives, challenges and feelings.

Additionally on the forum, emerging artists will be able to showcase aspects of their artistic creations and acquire feedback in order to help become published. This will assist artists with becoming creative contributors in Good Morning Bedtime Story (GMBS) anthologies.

To help manage the forum, GMBS will require moderators to look at the conversations taking place to ensure that none begin to show racism, hatred, derogatory comments or excessive violence.

Moreover, GMBS still has a number of openings available for volunteers. Jobs will include updating social media pages; posting calls for submissions to anthologies; marketing any new ventures the organization is undertaking, and creating ideas to advantageously benefit the organizational cause.

GMBS is always open for online submissions, which will be posted on the website. Volunteers too are able to contribute with submissions, and those who volunteer their services have the opportunity to receive a recommendation for their resume.

If anyone is interested in becoming involved with GMBS, you can e-mail them at: gmbssubmissions@gmail.com

In the e-mail, explain why mental health matters to you, what ideas you have to help further promote the organization, and also outline whether you are interested in working as a forum moderator. Only successful applicants will be contacted.

If you ever want to submit work to GMBS, you may submit poetry, writing (both fictional and memoir), music and images relating to mental health to: gmbssubmissions@gmail.com

You are able to post under a pseudonym if you wish, and all published work remains copyright of the original creators. Be sure to include the word ‘submission’ in the title of the e-mail.

Thank you for reading and I hope you consider submitting work and contributing to the organization.

Have a great day. I wish all of you health and happiness in 2014. Cheers!

Universum Student Test

Hey guys!

I don’t often advertise on this particular blog, but this is important.

Universum, a major company which works alongside organisations from around the world has recently unveiled their annual survey for university students to undertake. By completing the ‘Wet Feet Career Test’, students, who are uncertain of their future career paths, will be able to know their career profile and discover which jobs are right for them.

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In my spare time I am working as a Student Ambassador for the Australian survey. I believe this is an important endeavor because in the coming year, many university students may not be able to find themselves a job. Making the right career choice can be one of the hardest decisions, and this survey will assist students in finding the career that is right for them.

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For university students in Australia, the survey can be undertaken here: http://unisurv.co/1010auss14

I wish you the best of luck.

Global Warming? How do you spell that again? C-L-I-M-A-T-E C-H-A…

 

This piece contains some coarse language.

For anyone living in Australia, you would now know one hundred per cent how it feels to be afflicted with the ‘carbon tax’ (queue the spooky music…du, du, du, du!). For any readers who are not Australian and just read my last sentence and thought ‘eh?’ do not be alarmed! Allow me to quickly explain what the carbon tax is…

The carbon tax is a form of tax orchestrated by the Australian Labor Party and the Greens which has been a work in progress for roughly the past couple years and has only now come to fruition. It is also a tax that was supposed to never occur, but funnily enough the politician who made such a bold statement seemed to forget she made that promise…immediately after becoming Prime Minister…

The Carbon Tax is generated to supposedly bring down carbon emissions of larger companies and to basically teach the wider Australian community that carbon ix bad, and less carbon is good. Items that contain no carbon, or do not harm the environment do not acquire the tax, which is supposed to cause the people of Australia to buy these products rather than those that contain carbon – and the tax that is now mandatory with it. However, just like girls and chocolate, we know carbon is bad for us – but in the end we just can’t seem to get enough of the products that contain it.

I do believe it was in 1997 that the Liberal Party were involved in instigating the GST (General Standard Tax, although I don’t think I needed to say what that acronym means…), which was applied to a large monopoly of items and to this very day still is. The Carbon Tax is much like this, and after been introduced last week, has already begun to plague the public, especially small business owners, who fear that they will be forced to pay more for their supplies, which includes anything from fresh food and groceries to household appliances.

Although don’t ask me how a banana or an apple or a bit of meat on a slab that up until five hours ago was going ‘mooo!’ is in any way capable of nefariously affecting our environment. Simply put – why is fruit been taxed? Why is meat been taxed? I know a cow when alive eats and farts grass all day – but an innocent piece of red meat? What did it ever do to hurt anyone – except for bleed in the car on the way home…hate when that happens!

However, the PM has issued money to all Australian residents to help pay for the newly initiated tax. The allotment supplied however depends on whether a person is single, whether they be a couple, or whether they be a family with kids. Basically, a person may receive anything between $70 to around $400 per month is it? I’m not really down with the figures, but this grant is supposed to assist with paying for the tax, which almost seems a little redundant if you ask me. I mean, why tax something, only to help people pay for it? Then again almost everything seems to be on the verge of being taxed. Should only be glad that the air we breathe and the carbon dioxide we breathe back out does not come with a charge. No, sorry I spoke too soon – I think that is been implemented next week.

Amazingly enough, last time I checked the mining industry was not been taxed, and at the very start one of the whole ideas – was to tax the mining industry!

Now, with this said, I think it’s obvious that I am not a fan of the ominous Carbon Tax and am therefore not gonna dance up and down the street supporting the damn thing. However, if I am to look at this tax without personal bias and loathing, I do believe there are some possible efficacious reasons behind its introduction, rather than simply malicious ones.

FOLLOW THE LEADER!
I do believe it was at this year’s climate change summit that PM Julia Gillard spoke to other countries about the growing need to save our planet from the villainous enemy that is carbon. Basically, she was laughed out of the show for suggesting such a thing. Why? Do not other countries want to save the world? Maybe…but why take advice about saving the world from a country that can’t be bothered saving it themselves?

If Australia begins a carbon tax and shows how it is reducing carbon emissions by limiting the spread of major companies and their use of such a source of power, then other countries may be inclined to follow suit. It’s all fun and easy for Australia to sit back and say to other countries the likes of America and Asia and Europe that they ought to consider taxing carbon emissions, but if Australia is not doing the same thing, then why listen. That’s like saying to a friend of yours ‘walk through that mine field to collect our tennis ball’, whilst at the same time you yourself are not going to accompany him in and risk being blown up just as he is. That’s the thing – this whole carbon tax could blow up in our faces.

I guess in this sense Australia is being the guinea pig. Probably a good idea. If Australia puts its money where its mouth is for once in its life and takes the first step in a mature direction, the other countries of the world may step up to the table and do the same thing.

Doing the right things costs nothing. Well, in this case it does, but it will be worth it in the end if everything is successful. Well, I hope so, otherwise not only will we be drowning in carbon emissions, bankruptcy, people and political bull – but we’ll be broke as well!

BUILDING AN AWARENESS AGAINST THE CHANGE IN CLIMATE
Who really cares about climate change? Who really cares about global warming? They are both one and the same, funnily enough. Except the latter sounds far nicer than the former.

Yes ladies and gentleman the elephant in the room has officially been spotted. No, no, not the same sex marriage elephant, that poor little guy was hunted down to extinction. That’s what happens when you have a government filled with homophobes. And not the elephant in regards to migration and asylum seekers – I do believe that one was been trafficked across the ocean when its ship capsised and drowned. No, I’m talking about the one in regards to carbon emissions!

By having a carbon tax, the Australian public get something from it – what? A bigger bill? Well, that too, but I am talking about the unavoidable discovery of climate change. It cannot be ignored again now that a tax has been promulgated and has been officially revealed to the Australian public, and carbon has been visualised as the horrific monster that it is. And even though at least half the country is talking about how much they hate the friggin’ tax, at least they are still talking about it, right? Right?

If Australia builds up an awareness of the carbon emission issue, then other countries will be able to see it for what it is; a worldwide pandemic that ultimately threatens to devastate our way of living if we do not do something about it immediately.

However, in all fairness our planet is already so far fucked not even Heaven herself could save us. But if we lucky and are still able to stop the hands of time from ticking, then we would have saved our future generations. The only problem is they’ll be broke cuz their families wasted all their money paying for the carbon tax…

HELPING TO SAVE THE WORLD
Inevitably, if the scientists and the PM are correct and the carbon tax is going to ultimately save our asses, then that in my view would be reason enough for the tax to be successful. If it works, and is proven to be effective in fighting the issues with our changing climate, then it will be of great interest for other countries to instigate. Upon a majority of countries in the world initiating such a (what could be sometimes visualised as) drastic movement against the changing climate, then we will effectively be getting somewhere with the preservation of our future.

The real change will begin when countries like China, who have a carbon foot print that makes Godzilla’s look immeasurably miniscule, begin to come to the table. Australia’ population is roughly 25 mil. America’s is a couple hundred mil, and China’s is well into the bil+. My point? 25 million people can’t honestly cause as much carbon damage as a country with a couple hundred million, and a country containing a couple hundred million people can’t do nearly as much damage as a country with a good billion people running around inside it.

So the PM may charge us for our carbon footprint, but even if we continue this for the next couple hundred years or more and Australia effectively reduces its emissions by 50%, 75% or hell, even 100%, it is going to do sweet not much at all if every other country just sits back and continues to use and abuse what they have. The world ain’t gonna be saved just because one country decided to tax carbon and reduce emissions. We are only doing this for our pathetically tiny part of the world. The other countries need to look out for their own, and if they don’t, then all our lives may well be lost.

Very recently South Korean scientists made the discovery that Minke Whales are yummy. Maybe tomorrow another South Korean scientist will come to the realisation that something needs to be done about the carbon emissions of the world. All it takes is another country to step up to the table and announce the same thing the Australian PM has for the statement to be better heard.

Now, I will admit, true, I have complained and have taken umbrage at this whole carbon tax fiasco, but the reason I am so concerned is simple. Australia is a small country and I become concerned when someone changes the biscuits that I have with my afternoon coffee. A change in the way I spend my dollars of course will be considerably more dramatic in my life. Also, I may believe that the world is drowning in its own carbon fumes, but that don’t mean I have to enjoy the idea of forking out an extra few dollars each and every day.

AN ANSWER TO THE ECONOMIC RECESSION?
Yes, why the hell not! Most of the world is drowning under the issue that is the economic recession, especially in Europe. Think about it…if European nations begin to tax people on carbon, that could be one way to boost the amount of money governments had.

I know when I first heard our PM talk about the carbon tax I initially thought it was just another money raking scheme that she had concocted out of thin air to gain a little extra cash on the side. Well, in my defense against such ignorance our PM does seem to give herself and her municipals a pay rise every second week, which mind you, comes out from the rate payer, which explains why our bills have miraculously increased by almost 25% over the past couple months alone…so why not ask the people of this country for a little more money in the disguise of a tax that addresses something that cannot be seen. That’s like making a tax against ghosts.

But like I have already said I actually believe that carbon is an issue that needs to be resolved, and maybe our PM legitimately cares and is the right lady for the job to lead our country into the future. Only time will tell.

What I can say however is that although our PM likes to swear up and down that our country has the best economic situation in the ENTIRE WORLD and believes this to be true to such an extent that she bragged about it at a summit not too long ago where the economic recession was the primary topic of discussion. I guess the PM simply forgot that little Queensland was attached to our little country. Well, it only takes up a good fifth of this country of ours, so it’s understandable that it is very easy to be dismissed. My point is that Queensland is 12 billion dollars in debt. Maybe that simply slipped the PM’s mind when she was discussing our great Australia’s debt situation was? Here, the carbon tax could be a good way to help soothe the situation, and I do believe that politicians in Queensland have suggested the exact same thing. But of course, those politicians, they will gain a little bit for themselves – let’s not lie. An extra buck in the pocket is always great.

So with that said, if the carbon tax cannot help our country’s be rid of any carbon issues – perhaps it could help with many of the economic ones that keep sprouting out from the ground like Lemmings.

CONCLUSION
Either way we are for the moment stuck with the carbon tax. Now, I am yet to consult my little crystal ball, so I do not foresee what will come of such a tax, but I can say that if it helps this little blue and green planet of ours from staying little, blue and green – why the hell not allow its longevity, along with our own in the process?

This is Naughty Nefarious, signing off

GIFT or CURSE? A piece about WRITING, PUBLISHING and UNIVERSITY

 

Contains some coarse language.

Plan? What plan? Talk to the architect if you want a plan! Yep, that’s right – if you came here for advice, you are sadly mistaken, cuz here, you will find anything but…

…Going to a university after college/high school/whatever it’s called, is all well and good, but are there repercussions to this as well?

As a person who wanted to work professionally in the writing field, I found out the hard way that employer’s do not take people seriously who do not have valid credentials in the field they wish to enter. Now, by writing, I meant a professional, who worked on pieces from prose to poetry, through to novels and screenplays. Yes, I suffer from delusions of grandeur, but a dream is a dream until it is proven to be 100% unachievable, and I am yet to reach that unfortunate stage.

But, why a writer? So many people these days want to be teachers and shrinks and work in PR. Well, I could that writing has always been a guilty pleasure of mine, but I think that Australian author Michael Hyde, who was my lecturer for my introduction to Creative Writing class during my first semester of University put it best. Now, I hope to write this properly, but it has been a couple years since he explained this, so I might not be entirely accurate in my words – if he happens to read this he’ll probably shake his head at me. Dr. Hyde (yes, doctor, not mister!) explained how he was once teaching at this school. There was a student who could write very well, but to impress his friends he did his best not to focus on writing as much as he did sports and drinking, and other usual Aussie bloke stuff. Anyway, this literary competition is held at the school, and Dr. Hyde asks this student to submit his piece. For further encouragement, he explains how women like writers – they find men who write absolutely irresistible. The student is quite unsure; his friends laugh at him, believing writing to be the kind of thing done by losers and nerds – not by stereotypical Aussie blokes. Anyway, after much convincing the student decides to enter his piece into the competition – and wins! But, the morale of the story has not yet come to pass…the following morning, Dr. Hyde is walking down a corridor – and he sees the young woman who every man in the entire school had been lusting over embracing the student who had won the competition – yes, the same student Dr. Hyde had encouraged to enter. So, walking over to them, Dr. Hyde whispers into the ear of the student ‘told yer so.’ So, there you have it…the reason why I want to write – to gain the attention of all the foxy ladies.

Besides, in regards to other avenues of study…in relation to PR, 1) I’m no good at communicating with the general public, and 2) I’m no good at communicating with my relations, so how the hell could I ever be any good at Public Relations? And as for teaching – often has good opportunities for economic compensation, but other than that…besides, students usually freak the hell out of me, so it’s one of those thanks but no thanks ventures. Some people are scared to fly. Some people are frightened of the dark. I’m terrified to students. Moving on…

…Between the ages of thirteen and fifteen during some of my spare time I completed three short story collections, each containing six pieces. However, by the end the word ‘short’ may have very well been the last word I would have used to describe them, with the shortest piece indeed being 7 pages in length, whilst the largest was 102, and the average was 60; not exactly the definition of the term ‘short’ now, are they?

Unfortunately for me, at the time I had no literary agent, and only a very small per cent of Australian publishers are willing to accept unsolicited content; Penguin and their subsidiary Puffin, Allen and Unwin (at the time at least), Text Publishing, just to name a few. However, these publishers may say ‘we will accept unsolicited material’, but never is there a clause that expresses ‘we will publish unsolicited material.’ I learnt very quickly that every single publishing house had a problem with short stories; unless you were a known quantity in the industry, then this notion did not apply. I remember reading on the MacMillan page that they did not publish short stories, yet in the exact same month I read that known Australian author Andy Griffiths, most notable for his ‘Just’ franchise, had another of his short story collections published by their company! So, the rules are rules, unless you are a published author, in which case none actually apply to you.

Unfortunately for me, on the first occasion I happened to submit something, I mentioned my age, which at the time was 14. After almost half a year, in which I had given up waiting for this particular publishing house and had sent pieces to a couple others, I was notified in the mail whether or not I was successful. Of course I wasn’t, as depicted by the general tone of the paragraph. Did they supply a reason? Yes, amazingly enough…they explained how a 14 year old writer could never be taken seriously in the industry, and if one is writing short stories aimed for a young, adolescent audience, then they cannot be members of that readership – they need to be older, and more experienced in age and life, for nobody would ever want to read the work of a teenager. Safe to say I never mentioned my age in a cover letter again.

Anyway, long story short (pun included?) I contacted a literary agency, and after a few months was able to successfully converse with one of their employees about how short stories were not a popular market – in which I found out that they actually are! True, short stories never sell as many copies as novels, but they are especially well enjoyed by younger audiences because of their general length. It’s that publishers do not want to take the risk with a short story collection. On occasion, these collections have gone belly up for publishers, which is why they are after something more – a novel. Luckily enough for me, at the time I had an idea for a science fiction novel which I had been developing for some time.

Of course, something always gets in the way, right? Well, in this instance it was plain ol’ me…I finished the novel in December of 2009 after working on it for roughly six whole years. I took one look at my finished product and thought ‘what a piece of shit.’ Okay, honestly, it may not have been all that bad, but there was more I wanted to develop within the story in regards to the centralised characters and the lead antagonists. Additionally, I leant a lot whilst writing the story. The one thing I took away with me from high school was this; it don’t matter if you are writing a story set in the past, present or the future, if you do not have themes, or if you do not discuss pertinent issues that are reminiscent of today’s society, you will not gain a very broad readership. So, what are strong themes or issues transpiring today? Well, there is gay marriage, war, especially the one in the Middle East, racism and terrorism. There is love and sexism and rights for women. Safe to say, one can develop a piece with futuristic themes and such, but only the writer will really be privy to such a fantasy. The reader needs something that they can understand and clearly relate to, else you ain’t gonna succeed.

Additionally, I thought another aspect of writing on my lonesome, which Michael Hyde further discussed in his second lecture. What is this you might wonder? Well, at the beginning of my first novel (the term ‘beginning’ is loosely used – basically means the entire first half) I dominated my characters. I ruled over them with an iron fist! I wanted each and every one of them to live up to the notions and developments that I had conceived in my mind, and nothing was gonna get in my way from having them end up the way I wanted them to. However, by the second half of the piece I had altered my train of thought and relieved my characters of my ruling and allowed them to run free across the page. What did I learn from this experience? If you sit back, your characters will do everything for you – all you need to do is write it down. The freedom my characters had from this point onwards guaranteed them change from my initial plan that I had scheduled for their futures and changed many of the conclusions I had initially conceived.

I also happened to unfortunately find when I tried to publish this first novel of mine that I had just chosen to write in the one genre that I probably shouldn’t have. Yes, sci-fi is a very well rounded and broad subject that is enjoyable around the world; the problem? At least half, if not more Australian publishers are scared shitless of publishing sci-fi because it could blow up in their faces! Why/how did I not know this when I first began? SHIT! Anyway, instead of giving up ion such a genre or reinventing parts of the novel, I decided to move onto the development of another sci-fi oriented piece – which I am still developing to this very day.

True, probably not one of the most intelligible of things to do since I knew what to expect from the industry, but there was one more thing I was counting on; the experience I had been told that was a necessity for me back when I was fourteen…I was, and still am, attempting to acquire it. I’m in my third and final year of my undergraduate university course, but I have no intention of stopping there. Next, I wish to complete my masters, and then my doctorate, and then I can be Dr. Naughty Nefarious! However, what I am really aiming for is plain and simple professional courtesy – if I have gone all the way to gain a doctorate (that is if I succeed, which I hope to do so), I am hoping to look pretty darn respectable. I mean, how many people in total within Australia have gone on to gain doctorates? I don’t mean to seem pretentious or egotistical, but I am hoping this may provide to me a bonus, as to allow me to stand out from the other hopeful writers of tomorrow.

In the meantime though, what can I possibly do? Well, that is where the Gift/Curse part of the headline comes into play…one can gain a university degree, or go on to complete their postgrad, but all of this comes at a price. And I don’t just mean economically, although that is gonna be one helluva issue whine it comes time for me to pay off the rotten bastard of a tab that I have wafting over my head like a dark, angry storm cloud. No, I of course mean professionally. If one is after a job after attaining such qualifications and is unable to gain one in their intended industry, what next? That is the problem, because ‘what next’ is a great, big puddle of utter nothingness. Employers not in the field of study one has accomplished want NOTHING TO DO WITH YOU! Why not? One, you are too over qualified. Actually, that is basically the one and only point. Due to this, you will constantly be searching for another occupation – one in your chosen felid that you explicitly studied for, and once you acquire that dream job, you will leave the one you currently have. Employers don’t want to put time and investment into a worker who will inevitably leave – no, they want someone they can train and bend to their every whim like to an able pet. So, gaining one’s dream educational qualification is all well and good, but it will ultimately prohibit oneself from gaining an employment- anywhere but in their chosen field, and if the job you seek is not hiring, well, to be blunt – you’re fucked!

Naughty Nefarious, signing off!

To have an internship or not to have an internship? Now that is one helluva serious question

 

I would never have assumed that my three year course at university would go by me so fast. It seems like yesterday that I was driving up to the university, and now I am but on the verge of driving away from it, and only seeing it once more in my rear view mirror. Of course, the journey is not yet over, and like with all journeys, there is always something that gets in the way. The vile antagonist in this case, if such a word could ever be used in this circumstance, is the mandatory internship that I am to gain in order to successfully pass this course unimpeded. As a person majoring in professional writing, I am to secure a place within an organisation that will allow me to do just that; write professionally. That however is not as easy a task as one might assume, or one that I might have once ignorantly believed.

I was under the distinct impression when I signed up for this course that the university would help me, along with all of the other students enrolled in the course gain said internship. Now, how exactly did I acquire such an idea, when the university now refuses to do such a thing? Oh, that’s right! They explicitly said so in the course outline! It is so amazing how the written word over time has apparently lost all meaning and now is as bitter and foul tasting as the lies people verbally convey to protect one another.

The university does every so often send out an e-mail of possible opportunities that are available to us, so I will give them credit on that count, but it is ultimately we who need to gain the internship. They may point us in an appropriate direction, but they do nothing more than that. A couple students and I talked about this on Friday the first of June, how we were all quite surprised at how we were the ones who acquired the job, not the university. Many said it was difficult because they had other commitments, including work outside of the necessary internship, university work and families that two of them had, such inevitably making the task more difficult to accomplish. They however had succeeded in gaining an internship. Me? Not so much I’m afraid.

I began to send out resumes back at the beginning of May, which just so funnily enough was when the university told us to start considering our placements. Those involved in the course next semester that will evolve around our internship theorised how we should consider local councils as possible venues to intern in. Well, I will say this; it is a great idea in theory, when you are talking about it from afar, but not so much in person when it comes to applying. There are three local councils in my area; one is yet to get back to me on my internship. One refuses to get back to me, even after all this time has passed (I sent mine on the third of May), and the other was no longer accepting when I submitted mine, which I find hilarious because I submitted my application the same day they announced their internship program. Curious indeed….

I additionally looked into other companies, however very few are looking for interns. We are told to look into organisations that evolve around our field of study, but I am quite surprised to find that most of these venues refuse to accept interns of any shape or size. They want people to fully commit to their organistaion for a good few years, not a good couple weeks.

Recently in the news there was talk that interns are especially hard done by when they attempt to apply for positions because there simply ain’t enough to go around. Many sectors are highly popular and there are only select places accepting interns, with those organisations only having a certain number of spots available. This is especially true for Sydney, where it was discussed that nurses in particular and other doctorial applicants are unable to intern because every available position has already been filled. I fear the same is happening down in Melbs, and I can only hope I fare a bit better.

The thing that is affecting me so I do believe is the experience. Now, don’t get me wrong, I have worked. When I was younger I worked as a child model for clothing companies, and when I was in my adolescent years I worked at Coles for a period of time. In all honesty however, I focused primarily on my studies than my work experience, believing that after completion of my university courses I will have all the time in the world to acquire a job. Unfortunately, it would seem that my ideas have come back to bite me in the arse, and I now find myself unwanted as an intern in the industry. Of course, if I am having trouble now, things aren’t going to get any easier when I go to complete my masters and find myself needing to acquire yet another internship. Especially since I was pondering about continuing on with my masters immediately after my three years of study were complete.

I will of course keep searching, and I have up until the end of October to gain an internship and complete it. Fifteen eight hour work days seemed simple in theory. Now, if I can acquire them – then I will be onto something.

The Rich get Richer and the Poor stay Poor

Earlier this week the news was reporting upon a new workforce plan; the importing of overseas workers to work in Australia when we already have plenty of workers living in this country.

This however is not a new plan. It has being in the news on and off for the past couple years, especially since PM Julia Gillard took office. The general idea is that Australia supposedly requires a certain amount of skilled migrants to fill the jobs that nobody wants to have in this country. It is believed that there is a certain amount of workers required for each job, and migrant labor is imported to fill this quota, for too many Australian’s are interested in occupations that are already filled, and the more perhaps ‘unpopular’ jobs in turn need compensation. However, the blade cuts both ways, and on several occasions there have been reports in the news from countries the likes of Afghanistan, who reported that Australia was stealing many of its workers, especially those in the medical professions to work in Australia when in fact they were required back in their home country.

This plan however now has been redressed, but just because you slop on a new paint, give it a fancy bow and call it a new name, does not mean it is any different. This new plan, being pushed by one of the most powerful women, if not the most powerful in Australia (to keep her identity a secret, let’s call her Gina Rinehart), is in accordance to her massive mining organisation. The plan is to bring ‘skilled’ migrants from overseas, (the name China was in the news) and to bring them down to Australia to work for a certain allotment of time that seems to have been lost in the news.

I have a couple questions though that have not yet been answered, and nor will they. The massive monopoly that is the Australian mining organistaion is to powerful to be stopped by a couple questions that nobody sees as being of any import. The government also, which is supposed to be in charge of this country seems to bow down to these major monopolies and allow them all they want whenever they want it. If there are ever any issues, they are soon reassured with a couple dollars being tossed about parliament house in the directions of those who can get the ball rolling.

But, back to those two questions of mine…one, who defines what a ‘skilled’ migrant is? And two, why not use Australian workers for a job on Australian soil? I do not see other countries crying out for Australian workers to go work over on their shores.

For all we know, these migrants may just be people trying to gain asylum, and it is yet to be determined what is to happen once they have finished their quota. Now, I’m not saying I have a problem with migrants. Well, I hope that’s not what it sounds like. There’s a documentary commencing soon which discusses whether Australian’s are ‘dumb, drunk and stupid’, and if it turns out to be a biography of my life, then I suppose I will be proven wrong. However, I digress. What I’m saying, is that big business should not sugarcoat everything, or wrap it in a big beautiful bow in the hopes that the Australian people will not notice it is the same gift they were granted one year earlier by a person with a different name. The people should be told what is happening, and how it will affect them. Now, one may wonder how it could ever affect them, but it certainly will. There are many workers, too many to number I am certain, who could very easily do the jobs that these skilled migrants are being imported for. This is just yet another occurrence where Australian’s lose their jobs to people who are not even Australian citizens. Seems a little ridiculous if you ask me. Unemployment rates have sky rocketed recently due to these same occurrences which are transpiring in more than just the mining industry, and it is all happening for the exact same reason…migrants, whether they are skilled or unskilled, trained or untrained, are cheaper. They are paid less wages for the same hours of work an Australian would do. That is the primary reason. Big business becomes greedy and does not want to fork out an extra couple bucks per worker, and so tosses them out in replacement for somebody from another country who can’t speak a word of English and who probably couldn’t tell the difference between Australia and America if they were given a map, no offence intended

In addition to this, skilled migrants may not initially be ‘skilled’, but they certainly can be in the labor market they are provided for. It is easy and cheap to skill a migrant in the occupation that they are imported for, and there is no fear of them ever leaving. They are brought over here for one job. They are then trained for one job. And they are then hired for that one job. They are not skilled in any other, and so big business owners do not have to worry about half their staff flocking to another profession when they send their resumes to other businesses in the hopes of bettering themselves. That is the problem with a university degree or any other educational benefit. True, it allows you to work in the industry you want. But it is a curse too, for nobody wishes to hire a person skilled in public relations for instance, when they are going to be working in a business that does not require such skills, for they will know that this new addition to their team will be constantly looking for the work they are after, and will eventually leave.
In that sense, it is easier for a large corporation to hire on somebody who will not leave, and who will solely commit their time in the workforce to the job they are given upon arrival in this country.

I think I said this before, and I am going to say it again. This here, is quite ridiculous. If you live in Australia, or any country in fact, you should be given the opportunity to do whatever job you wish to do, not sit back and watch as that job is given to somebody else who is not even from this country. True, it is great to help those from third world countries find jobs and better opportunities than they could ever be granted back home. But it does not help the Australian people who need those jobs to acquire money to feed their families and keep roofs over their heads. Why should we be forced to sit back and suffer unemployment when there are plenty of positions available to us? Sorry, did I just say ‘are’. My bad; that should be ‘were’ plenty of jobs, now they are all filled up with skilled migrants.

But this is just my opinion. What do you think?